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London

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© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets

DaddysGotSweets is also known by her real name Beth, a spirited photographer from Wales but now residing in London. Her work is based mainly around documenting nightlife – an industry that she is extremely passionate about, with music on of the fundamentals of her life. Beth’s photos reflect her deep, unwavering love for clubs and electronic music.

Name? Beth.

Age? 29.

From/Location? Wales.

How long have you considered yourself a photographer? I’ve been saying five years for at least three years now, so probably about eight years. Although I guess it was only after three years that I thought, “Yeah, I can do this.” So five years. Or eight.

Camera of choice? Nikon (d600).

Specialist area of expertise? Parties and peoples.

Inspirations? Marc De Groot and Nick Ensing for me were the pioneers of party photography. It was never a conscious, “Wow I want to do that” but I definitely remembered taking an interest in what they do. Also an amazing book called ‘Last Nights Party’, the photos were naughty and raw and it really made me realise that photos can be real instead of just glamourised and polished.

Tell me a little bit about your selection of photos? The photos I’ve chosen don’t have so much of a theme, they’re just images that stuck out to me. I never wanted to be a photographer, for me I’m a raver, I love music and partying, the photography is a by-product of that. So the images aren’t so much “Wow incredible crowd shot of amazing production” because that’s never what I set out to do, I prefer images that convey an emotion, tell a story or encourage the viewer to create a story in their own imagination.

Where can our readers see more of your work? daddysgotsweets.carbonmade.com and www.instagram.com/daddysgotsweets

Click the images for high resolution…

© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets
© DaddysGotSweets

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Some time ago DLTM heard that Prosumer and Tama Sumo, two of Berlin’s finest DJs, organise their own pub quiz somewhere in Kreuzberg. It took us a little while but we finally managed to assemble some troops during a whistlestop visit to the German city in November 2014. We arrived late, but between three of us we managed to come third from bottom. The experience left us thinking that we should give it another try and maybe win next time. It took over a year, but we went back in January 2016, here’s the story of that night interspersed with words from Prosumer and Tama, who we spoke to when they brought the pub quiz to the Dalston Superstore in London not long ago. Before you start reading, make sure you hit the play button on Prosumer’s ‘Grower mix’ below, too.

“I was in North America on a nice road trip heading north with three friends. At a certain point we decided we needed to get some dinner and we passed a huge sign saying ‘Trivia Night’. In unison the three of us said, ‘Let’s do that!’. We had a great time, I’d been to pub quizzes before in the past, a few in Berlin and I thought there was potential in doing something,” says Prosumer, speaking about the beginnings of the now infamous pub quiz moments after the first ever London edition has come to an end. “I love stacking up piles of useless knowledge and then I told Tama about the idea…”

Tama continues, “Yes, you told me about it. The thing is, in Germany, pub quizzes are not so common plus we also love Sudblock. We didn’t have any great expectations, we just thought, ‘It’s fun and, well, if 10 or 20 people come then that’s fine!'”

Sascha, Prosumer and Mysti at the pub quiz held at Südblock in Kreuzberg, Berlin
Prosumer was joined by guest Sascha and hostess Mysti

Sudblock is found right in the middle of Kreuzberg, at the famous junction next to Kottbusser Tor U-Bahn station. It’s well-known for its support for the local community. Sudblock is a large L-shaped bar serving up pizza and other such bar food, with cakes also on offer, plus a decent selection of alcoholic drinks. The sparkling ceiling is decorated with a collection of disco balls and the audience is a mix of young and old, internationals who have clearly tagged on a few extra days to a weekend trip and Berliners. “I like the community idea behind the quiz, it brings people together; people from the nightlife, local people from Kreuzberg… I like that. Sometimes things can be too exclusive – this event for the twenty-somethings, that event for the older crowd, which makes no sense really,” says Tama.

“Let’s face it, we’re getting older and we have a lot of friends who we don’t see at club events anymore. People who prefer to go out midweek and be in bed by midnight and I really love the crowd that we attract,” says Prosumer. “In Berlin there are a lot of places I miss, that no longer exist, Sudblock represents what a lot of those places stood for. You have this mixture of people; you have Turkish grandmas knitting, next to people who’ve straight from Berghain on Sunday morning.”

“Sudblock always wanted to integrate the neighbourhood. In the beginning when it started to become a gentrified district, they tried to keep it so it wasn’t just for the trendy people who were moving there. They do a lot for the locals, organising political discussions, anti-racism work and anti-homophobia projects,” Tama adds.

Tama Sumo, Prosumer and Mysti at Dalston Superstore in London
Tama Sumo, Prosumer and Mysti at the Dalston Superstore in London
Prosumer and Tama Sumo pub quiz held at Südblock in Kreuzberg, Berlin
DLTM team members deep in deliberation

Inside Sudblock DLTM have gathered up a group of eight friends, an international cast of miscreants from London, Ireland, Russia, Japan, France and the UK. We call ourselves ‘Too Late To Hate’ after getting to the venue a little after the starting time. The hostess with the mostest, Mysti, hands us our answers sheets and the quiz begins seconds after we sit down. “After the first couple of quizzes we were looking to shake things up, so we spoke to Dennis at Sudblock and he connected us with Mysti. It made perfect sense as Tama and I are not really ‘stage people’,” Prosumer says. “We’re a bit better now and it’s fun, but it’s very helpful having Mysti, too.”

Up on stage Prosumer is joined by special guest host Sascha, in Tama’s absence, and Mysti. The first round has us scratching our heads and having the odd heated debate, but answers seem to come confidently and swiftly. Questions like, ‘The first of January always falls on the same day as the first of which month of the previous year?’ definitely ruffle a few feathers in the crowd. We’re similarly perplexed with some of the questions. At the end of each round we swap answer sheets with another team and mark each others’ efforts.

Some of the obscure questions baffle us, especially during Claudia Bubel’s special ‘Islands’ round. Which is bigger, Taiwan or Ireland? We’re not sure but take an educated guess. In between rounds there’s a raffle – each team gets four tickets when they sign up. Somehow we win four of the six or so raffle draws, taking home a lint roller, a pot plant and bubblegums among other silly items – not forgetting a big kiss from Mysti and a shot of some kind of sweet tasting alcohol.

Prosumer and Tama Sumo pub quiz held at Südblock in Kreuzberg, Berlin
Collecting one of several raffle prizes during the quiz

Beers flow, food is munched, cigarettes smoked and lots of competitive glances are exchanged during the course of the quiz. You can see everyone trying to figure out how their opposition are getting on. The atmosphere is buoyant, some pub quizzes can feel a little bit pompous or staid, not this one – impossible with Mysti flouncing around, Mika Risiko and the rest of the team. Obviously a trivia fiend, Prosumer explains that he and Tama have a variety of sources for their often challenging questions, “The internet is good for this kind of thing, I also have a couple of books, we use interesting things we find in the newspaper sometimes. If we’ve been away, for example if Kerstin (Tama) goes to Australia then we do a round about that. In my case, I think I would do a James Bond every time because I have so much useless James Bond knowledge in my brain,” Prosumer jokes.

In Berlin, DLTM’s team are taking at least eight points out of 10 in each round. There’s a quiet confidence among our crew and the teams we swap scores sheets definitely don’t seem to be doing as well as we are, but there are around 12 teams in the room so we can’t be certain of victory until it’s announced (or not). We’re excited, inebriated and, regardless of a win, having a great time. Looking around the room and speaking to other teams, it’s clear everyone’s having an absolute blast.

Tama Sumo and Prosumer at Dalston Superstore in London
Tama Sumo and Prosumer, quiz masters

Tama and Prosumer recently brought the pub quiz over to London, at Dan Beaumont’s Dalston Superstore on Valentine’s Day, where the concept had a similar effect, attracting a vibrant crowd who spent the evening drinking and giving their brains a workout with questions covering topics from music and geography through to Netflix. “We’d love to take the pub quiz to more places outside of Berlin. We did one at Glastonbury, at Maceo’s, which was really funny as it was an after-party so everyone was probably not in the best condition to answer our difficult questions,” Prosumer laughs.

After handing in our final answer sheet, ‘Too Late To Hate’ wait around as the scores are tallied up by the ever diligent Mysti. One of our crew, producer and DJ Eric Volta, maintains that, since we came third from bottom last time, we had a very good chance of winning this time around. Lo and behold, the results are read out from bottom to top and ‘Too Late To Late’ are victorious. We pick up 106Euros in cash and head out into the Berlin night to celebrate with a naughty late-night karaoke session…

Prosumer and Tama Sumo pub quiz held at Südblock in Kreuzberg, Berlin
Too Late To Hate: Pub quiz winners – January 2016

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Kurt Angle VS Bobby Roode at TNA Maximum Impact 8
Kurt Angle VS Bobby Roode at TNA Maximum Impact 8

American wrestling is big business. Last year the industry’s biggest wrestling organisation, WWE, recorded a 21% increase in their annual profits, taking in a whopping $658.8million across the 12-month period. In the UK it’s huge, with WWE and TNA (Total Nonstop Action) two of the most popular wrestling promoters. At least once a year they bring a selection of their best-known wrestlers over for a tour, and DLTM picked up a few tickets for TNA’s recent Maximum Impact 8 show at Wembley Arena…

Having been pretty obsessed with WWE when we were kids (it was known as WWF back then), going to watch an American wrestling event in real-life was an exciting prospect. In the lead up to the big show we reminisced about the old days, the nineties, when stars like Hulk Hogan, Ultimate Warrior (RIP), ‘Macho Man’ Randy Savage (RIP), The Undertaker and Bret ‘The Hitman’ Hart were dominating the wrestling ring. Those innocent years when the whole thing seemed so real, so dramatic and so inspiring. Watching some of the old clip son YouTube, over 20 years on, makes for a very amusing experience indeed. Check this Randy Savage interview compilation for example.

Chasing Cadence get the crowd bopping at Wembley Arena ahead of the TNA Wrestling show
Chasing Cadence get the crowd bopping at Wembley Arena ahead of the TNA Wrestling show

At Wembley Arena, TNA brought in some of its big guns; Kurt Angle, Lashley, Matt Hardy, EC3, Rockstar Spud and Mark Andrews were among the names on the bill, attracting several thousand fans from across the UK to north-west London. Before everything kicked off, we were treated to a gig in the main entrance of the arena. Brilliant rock band Chasing Cadence entertained everybody who entered the building, and they were joined by one of the TNA’s silliest characters – Grado. A nice way to get all the fans relaxed and in the mood for a raucous night of action on the canvas.

TNA Maximum Impact 8 tour at Wembley Arena, north-west London
The ladies give each other airtime during a killer cage match

Word amongst most of the people we met was that Kurt Angle was soon to be bowing out of the TNA, so this event may well be his last in the UK. Certainly, the most excitement was generated by his name. After picking the obligatory foam fingers and a big bag of not so healthy snacks, it was into the arena to get seated and give our vocal chords a thorough workout during over four hours of piledrivers, drop kicks, clotheslines and a myriad other such wrestling moves.

Matt Hardy is disrobed as he enters the cage match against EC3 at TNA Wrestling's Maximum Impact 8 event in Wembley Arena
Matt Hardy is disrobed by Tyrus as he enters the cage match against EC3

A hilarious night ensued with TNA’s many colourful characters delivering a succession of impressive theatrics and acrobatics. High drama came with each match, whether it was personal feuds being settled, championship belts being fought for or that all conquering, potent source of motivation – pride. Highlights included the battle between Matt Hardy and EC3, full of drama and high octane moves, plus an appearance from the lumbering oaf that is Tyrus. The women’s matches lacked a little finesse and dynamism, but they were equally entertaining.

One of the TNA’s main stars Mark Andrews actually ended up with a real injury after he landed badly during a tag team match. After jumping off the ropes with his team mate’s assistance, he smashed into his opponent and hit the deck. It was clear he’d really hurt himself when the referee signaled to get him help. It was nothing too serious, but interesting to see the dangers the performers face in such a physically demanding environment. For all those who bemoan wrestling being ‘fake’, much of the action is about as real as can be and the entertainers do get hurt from time to time.

Eric Young is a blur as he goes to work on Damo: TNA Wrestling at Wembley Arena, north-west London
Eric Young is a blur as he goes to work on Damo
Damo is flat out after Eric Young's vicious move: TNA Wrestling at Wembley Arena, north-west London
Damo is flat out after Eric Young’s vicious move

Fans inside Wembley Arena never lost their energy through a long night of action, cage matches between Grado, and his comedic behaviour, against Eli Drake, Trevor and Tigre Uno and Eric Young and Damo, minus the cage, kept everyone engaged for the duration of the show… that a fair few pints and packets of sweets and crisps. Who said E numbers were a bad thing?!

But the finale was, of course, what everyone was waiting for. It didn’t disappoint. Kurt Angle grappled with Bobby Roode in a showdown that gripped the crowd for the entire match. Angle eventually took the victory, and hugged his opponent in typically sportsmanlike style. Angle’s reputation as a wrestler has made him one of the most respected and admired of his generation, decades of work in the squared circle have left him with countless injuries, as could be seen in his physical make up, and a well deserved retirement beckons.

Kurt Angle gets Bobby Roode in an 'Angle Lock' and wins the match
Kurt Angle gets Bobby Roode in an ‘Angle Lock’ and wins the match
Angle hugs Bobby Roode to a roar of cheers and applause from the crowd
Angle hugs Bobby Roode to a roar of cheers and applause from the crowd

In the meantime, he continues to wrestle and dazzle audiences around the world and, when he does eventually move on, no doubt the TNA will have a hard time filling his boots.

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Red Bull and Boiler Room celebrated their 5th birthdays on 5th November, 2015
Red Bull and Boiler Room celebrated their 5th birthdays on 5th November, 2015

Though they’ve collaborated on events in the past, this past week Red Bull Studios and Boiler Room went head-to-head with their 5th birthday celebrations. It’s not clear whether this was deliberate, but we have our suspicions… what’s more likely is that the 5th of November felt like an apt date to mark a milestone for both musical giants to get a load of people together for a good old shindig. And DLTM hit both events…

Red Bull…

Shy FX DJing at the Red Bull Studios 5th birthday event in London Bridge
Shy FX pon deck at the Red Bull Studios 5th birthday event

Kicking our Thursday night off at Red Bull Studios, we were greeted with a party bag and ushered down to the small bar in the basement of the complex where two dandy barman sorted us out a non-alcoholic “Devil’s Smash” (we’re off the booze this month) – from there we popped in to the upstairs area, which had been decked out in rather opulent gold drapes. Madam X was throwing down a nice blend of garage, grime and UK funky – being close cousins, the three genres flowed together effortlessly.

Red Bull Studios 5th birthday
One of the helpful attendants at Red Bull Studios 5th birthday
GotSome DJing at Red Bull Studio's 5th birthday in London Bridge
GotSome get busy at Red Bull Studio’s 5th birthday

Another bar supplied more cocktails and beers to the growing number of people who’d popped down to the London Bridge studios and there was a raised platform, rumoured by some to be a raised dance floor – unfortunately for Red Bull it became a dumping ground for all the party bags that had been handed out, a bit of a schoolboy error handing out to people on the way in…

Red Bull Studios 5th birthday
The reception area at the studios was converted to a lavish hangout spot

Besides that, Shy FX was of course on fire as per usual. Streamer cannons were let off a few times during his set, covering everybody in ticker tape. Downstairs the cheeky chappies from GotSome were throwing down a bit of dancehall (yes Adam!), which was well suited the basement room.

Overall a nice vibe, good cross section of heads and the music, unsurprisingly, was spot on.

Boiler Room…

By the time we got to Boiler Room (via Kojey Radical at Cargo) it was peak time and the Islington Steel Works was bustling outside and ramjam inside. Across three rooms Boiler Room kept it simple, staying true to their origins with the usual camera-to-DJ set up in each room.

Bradley Zero, Thristian and Nic Tasker get busy at Boiler Room's 5th birthday at Islington Steel Works
Residents Bradley Zero, Thristian and Nic Tasker get busy at Boiler Room’s 5th birthday

There were a few balloons dotted around the place but it was a largely minimal affair considering it was their 5th birthday celebration – we wouldn’t have expected anything more though. Boiler Room has always been relatively unassuming in its presentation of electronic music culture, letting the DJs, the music and the crowd around them do the talking.

Butterz rudeboys Elijah and Skilliam DJing in Room 1 at Boiler Room's 5th birthday at Islington Steel Works
Butterz rudeboys Elijah and Skilliam smash Room 1 at Boiler Room
Room 2 at Boiler Room's 5th birthday at Islington Steel Works
JG Wilkes of Optimo with ‘My Drug Shame’ emblazoned across his t-shirt

In the space of two or three hours we saw Butterz rudeboys Elijah & Skilliam bang out some raw old school grime, Boiler Room’s own Bradley Zero, Thristian and Nic Tasker going back-to-back-to-back in the Residents room, which was an entertainingly odd mix of oddball cuts as they tried to out-weird each other while still keeping everyone dancing. Upstairs in Room 2 we got a decent helping of techno to send us home with thundering kick drums echoing around the deepest recesses of our mind.

Two very different birthdays, Boiler Room had the edge, but that’s probably because we got there later in the day. Happy Birthday to both, here’s to many many more years of excellence…

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This past weekend we only had one destination in mind (after a rather busy house party on Saturday), and that was the twice-annual event Hyper Japan. The Far East nation has always been on our travel wishlist, way up there near the top as well, yet we’ve never made it there for one reason or another. In our teens we dreamed of becoming a computer games programmer and moving to Japan where we could really indulge in geeking it up, making and playing video games (strictly SEGA of course, in those days) and generally having a nerdy blast in a country that’s a complete other world, both culturally and socially. Alas, that dream never materialised, but we will make it to Japan one day…

In the meantime, Hyper Japan is a good way to dip one’s proverbial toe in the Far Eastern water. We’d been before, a few years ago in 2010, and had a great time, we also went to a Cosplay event at the Excel Centre in 2009, which was even more fun. In case you’re unaware, Cosplay is a fantastic subculture based around people dressing up as their favourite Anime characters – or making up their own fantasy outfits. There are varying degrees of Cosplay, from simple cat ears (very popular) and accompanying tail, all the way up to full-on helmets, masks and elaborate outfits, some of which the enthusiasts have taken time to fashion themselves.

A lot of Cosplay lovers are teenagers who are a tad geeky, which is great because it encourages them to express their fun, creative side and be confident enough to dress in an outlandish manner in public. Something we probably would have loved as shy, angst-ridden youngsters ourselves. Particular favourites include the retro ‘Lolita’ style of dress, which harks back to the 18th and 19th Century, with a British influence filtering into the gothic-leaning styles. We also love the fact that everyone who we took pictures of immediately pulled off some kind of dynamic or whimsical pose without so much as a second thought, brilliant!

Besides the Cosplay, Hyper Japan also showcases a cross section of the nation’s wonderful culinary culture, with (of course) lots of sushi on offer, along with numerous stalls serving up noodle dishes and the like. YUM. Anime comics and films are also on display in abundance. We’re massive fans of films like Akira and the like, with a huge soft spot for Japanese animation and art, from the incredibly detailed imagery of some artists through to the ultra simplistic, cutesy stuff. Such a distinctive and inspirational style. Alongside the comics are tons of toys, furry ones, tiny ones, all in bold bright colours. Trinkets aplenty, steam-punk fancy dress, an insane amount of wigs, some of which were ridiculously elaborate, singers, dancers, a whole separate section for video games and several fashion stalls made this a very worthwhile trip.

We can’t wait for the Christmas Market, plans are afoot for our very own Cosplay outfits…

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